The Omega Speedmaster Apollo Soyuz 145.022 1975

by bulang - Dec 04 2019

In pursuit of greater goals

We are delighted to welcome back our friend and collaborator @TheMasterOfSpeed, Matteo Leoni, who is regarded as one of the most knowledgeable vintage Omega Speedmaster experts. Today Matteo lifts the lid on another interesting and rare watch, The Omega Apollo Soyuz Speedmaster.

The Omega Speedmaster Apollo Soyuz 145.022 1975
The Omega Speedmaster Apollo Soyuz 145.022 1975
The Omega Speedmaster Apollo Soyuz 145.022 1975


After World War II, the United States and the former Soviet Union began an ideological warfare known as the cold war, which was mainly fought via propaganda and espionage.

Much of the technological development needed for space travel was employed in military missiles such as intercontinental ballistic missiles, making this technology of the utmost importance.

Space missions became a new theatre in which the cold war was played out. Sputnik 1 was the first significant event that initiated the Space Race as it would later become known, which officially starting on the 4th October 1957 with the first artificial satellite launch.

On the 17th of July 1975, the Apollo-Soyuz mission was launched and would result in an in-orbit coupling of two capsules to allow for a personnel exchange. The mechanism was developed by the two superpowers and built in the USA, and demonstrated that two different space capsules could join in orbit. As underlined by NASA, the human side of the mission went much further; during this space encounter, the crews demonstrated in few minutes the possibility to abolish cultural and language barriers in the pursuit of greater goals.

This mission represented a clean cut-off from the past; a past that was characterised by a real and heartfelt race. The space collaboration was a clear political signal of a desire for peace.
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The Omega Speedmaster Apollo Soyuz 145.022 1975
These five men compose the two prime crews of the joint United States-USSR Apollo-Soyuz Test Project (ASTP) docking mission in Earth orbit scheduled for July 1975. They are astronaut Thomas P. Stafford (standing on left), commander of the American crew; cosmonaut Aleksey A. Leonov (standing on right), commander of the Soviet crew; astronaut Donald K. Slayton (seated on left), docking module pilot of the American crew; astronaut Vance D. Brand (seated center), command module pilot of the American crew; and cosmonaut Valeriy N. Kubasov (seated on right), engineer on the Soviet crew.
The Omega Speedmaster Apollo Soyuz 145.022 1975
Two American ASTP prime crewmen have a meal with the Soviet ASTP first (prime) crewmen during Apollo-Soyuz Test Project joint crew training at NASA’s Johnson Space Center. The four are inside the Soyuz orbital module mock-up in Building 35. They are, left to right, astronaut Donald K. Slayton, docking module pilot of the American crew; cosmonaut Aleksey A. Leonov, commander of the Soviet crew; astronaut Thomas P. Stafford, commander of the American crew; and cosmonaut Valeriy N. Kubasov, engineer on the Soviet crew. The training session simulated activities on the second day in Earth orbit. During the actual mission the other American crewmen, astronaut Vance D. Brand, command module pilot, would be in the Command Module.
The Omega Speedmaster Apollo Soyuz 145.022 1975
Astronaut Alan L. Bean (foreground) and cosmonaut Aleksey A. Leonov participate in Apollo-Soyuz Test Project joint crew training in Building 35 at NASA’s Johnson Space Center. They are in the Apollo Command Module trainer. The training session simulated activities on the first day in Earth orbit. Bean is the commander of the American ASTP backup crew. Leonov is the commander of the Soviet ASTP first (prime) crew.
The Omega Speedmaster Apollo Soyuz 145.022 1975
Comparing watches… Speedy Tuesday?
The Omega Speedmaster Apollo Soyuz 145.022 1975
The Omega Speedmaster Apollo Soyuz 145.022 1975
A close-up view of the Commemorative Plaque for the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project. Two plaques divided into four quarters each will be flown on the ASTP mission. A four-part plaque is completely assembled here. The American ASTP crew will carry the four U.S. quarter pieces aboard Apollo; and the Soviet ASTP crew will carry the four USSR quarter sections aboard Soyuz. The eight quarter pieces will be joined together to form two complete commemorative plaques after the two spacecraft rendezvous and dock in Earth orbit. One complete plaque then will be returned to Earth by the astronauts; and the other complete plaque will be brought back by the cosmonauts. The plaque is written in both English and Russian.
The Omega Speedmaster Apollo Soyuz 145.022 1975
Two ASTP crewmen look over food cans and packages in the Soyuz orbital module trainer in Building 35 during Apollo-Soyuz Test Project joint crew training at NASA’s Johnson Space Center.
The Omega Speedmaster Apollo Soyuz 145.022 1975
The Omega Speedmaster Apollo Soyuz 145.022 1975
AST-05-263 (17-18 July 1975) — The Apollo-Soyuz Test Project (ASTP) Commemorative Plaque is assembled in the Soviet Soyuz Orbital Module during the joint U.S.-USSR Apollo-Soyuz Test Project docking mission in Earth orbit. The plaque is written both in English and Russian.
The Omega Speedmaster Apollo Soyuz 145.022 1975
The Apollo-Soyuz Test Project Signing Off
The Omega Speedmaster Apollo Soyuz 145.022 1975
The Omega Speedmaster Apollo Soyuz 145.022 1975
Russin vodka
The Omega Speedmaster Apollo Soyuz 145.022 1975
Cosmonauts Valeriy N. Kubasov (left) and Aleksey A. Leonov participate in English language training during Apollo-Soyuz Test Project preflight preparations at the Cosmonaut Training Center (Star City) near Moscow. Leonov was the commander of the Soviet ASTP first (prime) crew; and Kubasov was the flight engineer on the same crew. They are seated in the language laboratory at Star City. PHOTO COURTESY: USSR ACADEMY OF SCIENCES
The Omega Speedmaster Apollo Soyuz 145.022 1975
AST-03-171 (17 July 1975) — The hands of cosmonaut Valerly N. Kubasov are seen as the ASTP engineer adds his name to the signature on the Soviet side of the official joint certificate marking an historical moment during the rendezvous day of the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project. The left hand of astronaut Donald K. Slayton, NASA’s docking module pilot, is seen at left. The certificate had earlier been signed by astronauts Thomas P. Stafford, American crew commander; Slayton and cosmonaut Aleksey A. Leonov, Soviet crew commander, and it awaits the signature of astronaut Vance D. Brand, NASA’s command module pilot who remained in the CM while the others signed in the Soviet Orbital Module of the Soyuz.
The Omega Speedmaster Apollo Soyuz 145.022 1975
The Omega Speedmaster Apollo Soyuz 145.022 1975
These three NASA astronauts are the United States flight crew for the 1975 Apollo-Soyuz Test Project (ASTP) mission. The prime crew members for the joint United States – Soviet Union spaceflight are, left to right, Donald K. Slayton, docking module pilot; Vance D. Brand, command module pilot; and Thomas P. Stafford, commander. The American and Soviet crews will visit one another?s spacecraft while the Soyuz and Apollo are docked in Earth orbit for a maximum of two days. The ASTP mission is designed to test equipment and techniques that will establish international crew rescue capability in space, as well as permit future cooperative scientific missions.

The lucky number 100/500

To commemorate this milestone event in 1976, made exclusively for the italian market, Omega presented a limited edition of 500 pieces with very unique characteristics. The Speedmaster Apollo Soyuz was based on the classic Moonwatch reference 145.022 with calibre 861, fitting in a very specific serial range between 39’180’xxx and 39’181’xxx .

The Omega Speedmaster Apollo Soyuz 145.022 1975
The Omega Speedmaster Apollo Soyuz 145.022 1975
Such a powerhouse on the wrist. Same same but ohhhhh so different.

The most striking feature of the watch is the unique dial configuration, stripped of any Speedmaster indication but rather bearing the mission logo at 12 o’clock, a detail that will inspire many future limited editions placing the mission logo in the continuous second counter. Upon closer inspection we notice features from the calibre 321 era Speedmasters, such as the longer tritium indices compared to those of the same period.

The Omega Speedmaster Apollo Soyuz 145.022  1975

Another unique feature of the watch are the larger pushers, which were 0.5mm larger than regular pushers, meaning the pusher slot in the case is also slightly larger. The caseback is also unique to the watch, engraved with the mission medallion and the letter “I” followed by a progressive limited numbering. Our Speedmaster Apollo Soyuz is the lucky number 100. Furthermore, one other curious detail is the steel bracelet reference 1168, commonly known as the “Oyster” style that was seen on other Omega watches but very rarely on the Speedmaster, a confirmation of just how eclectic this limited really was.

The Omega Speedmaster Apollo Soyuz 145.022  1975
Lucky Number 100… happy to offer it for sale here
The Omega Speedmaster Apollo Soyuz 145.022  1975
The Omega Speedmaster Apollo Soyuz 145.022 1975
The Oyster Style bracelet 1168
The Omega Speedmaster Apollo Soyuz 145.022 1975
The Omega Speedmaster Apollo Soyuz 145.022  1975
The Omega Extract confirming the correct serial batch and Apollo Soyuz specification

All in all, it’s a series of special details that make this timepiece so unique, a mix of history and unique design, a representative symbol of the history of mankind.

Lucky Number 100 is available…

We are happy to be able to offer you the lucky number 100 Omega Apollo Soyuz Speedmaster. Check it out here…

The Omega Speedmaster Apollo Soyuz 145.022 1975
The Omega Speedmaster Apollo Soyuz 145.022 1975
The Omega Speedmaster Apollo Soyuz 145.022  1975
The Omega Speedmaster Apollo Soyuz 145.022 1975
The Omega Speedmaster Apollo Soyuz 145.022  1975
The Soyuz Speedmaster on our Taurillon Grey Heritage Strap you can get here

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